Geography

“Without Geography, you’re nowhere !”

Geography is unique in that it brings the social and natural sciences together. Human geography concerns the understanding of the dynamics of cultures, societies and economies, and physical geography concerns the understanding of the dynamics of landscapes and the environment.

Geography puts our understanding of social and physical processes within the context of place and explores the links between them. It provides an ideal framework for relating other fields of knowledge and is, in the broadest sense, an education for life and for living.

Learning through geography helps us all to be more socially and environmentally sensitive, better informed, and more responsible as citizens through a study of:

  • the places and communities in which we live and work
  • our natural environments and the pressures they face
  • the interconnectedness of the world and our communities within it
  • how and why the world is changing, both globally and locally
  • how our individual and societal actions contribute to change
  • the choices that exist in managing our world for the future
  • the importance of location in business and decision-making

Geography reflects the planet we live in and the issues we face every day – that is why it is all over the TV and media!

Curriculum Leader

Mrs. D. Howlett

Staff Members

  • Mrs. K Lloyd

“The study of Geography is about more than just memorising places on a map, it’s about understanding the complexity of our world” Barack Obama

Key Stage 3:

The KS3 curriculum allows learners to develop a range of geographical skills, knowledge and understanding through the study of a range of physical, human and environmental geography topics and issues. Geography is about the real world, so we focus on real issues and events that learners experience or see in the media.

Year 7: Investigating our World
Under the Weather
A focus on microclimates and climate hazards
Welcome to the Jungle
A focus on the sustainability issues facing the rainforests
Wish you were Here!
A focus on tourism and the sustainability issues linked to it
Settlements
A focus on urban development and change

Year 8:Our Changing World
Who wants to be a Billionaire!
A focus on the inequalities between high and low income countries
Crime–it’s just not PC!
A focus on the geography of crime
It’s a Wonderful World!
A focus on the processes that shape the landscape and cause flooding
Who wants to live Forever?
A focus on issues linked to population growth and migration

Year 9:Our Hazardous World
Geography of Conflict
A focus on how conflict affects and is affected by, geography
Disease
A focus on the geography of disease: patterns and factors affecting them
Running on Empty
A focus on the impact of our use of resources on the environment
Shake, Rattle & Roll!
A focus on the causes and impacts of tectonic hazards

Throughout our studies we develop and reinforce a wide range of geographical and transferrable skills such as map reading, drawing and interpreting a range of graph types, numeracy, ICT and literacy skills. Learners are expected to think, discuss and develop their reasoning skills whether working independently or in groups.

“Geography explains the past, illuminates the present and prepares us for the future. What could be more important than that?” Michael Palin

Key Stage 4(GCSE):

Geography enables young people to become globally and environmentally informed and thoughtful, enquiring citizens. Studying Geography at GCSE level provides opportunities for learners to understand more about the world, the challenges it faces and their place within it.

Following this course deepens understanding of geographical processes, illuminates the impact of change and complex people-environment interactions, highlight the dynamic links and interrelationships between places and environments at different scales, and develops learners’ competence in using a wide range of geographical investigative skills and approaches – skills that are valued by employers and colleges/universities alike.

Geography is about the real world, so concepts are illustrated in a variety of specified places and contexts so learners can relate what they do in the classroom or on fieldwork, to real world situations in order to make sense of them. The Geography Department has a long track record of excellent examination results, year on year.

Unit 1: Changing Physical & Human Landscapes

Landscapes and Physical Processes:  Allows you to explore the physical processes that create the various landscapes and land forms along our river valleys and coastlines. We look at some of the problems people experience such as flooding and how to manage it.

Rural-Urban Links: Urban and population growth and change. Contemporary challenges such as migration and retail change and how they can be managed.

Tectonic Landscapes & Hazards: The natural processes leading to the formation of volcanoes and earthquakes, their impact on people and how we can manage them to reduce the risk.

Unit 2: Environmental & Development Issues

Weather, Climate & Ecosystems: The natural processes that create distinctive weather and cause climate hazards in UK and Tropics – heatwaves, drought, storms and hurricanes. How climate creates ecosystems and the use and sustainability issues of these.

Development and Resource Issues: The causes and consequences of uneven development globally. How inequalities can be reduced and the challenge of creating sustainable water supplies.                                                                                                                             

Environmental Challenges: The impact of consumer choice on the environment, including climate change and destruction of natural habitats.

Unit 3: Applied Fieldwork Enquiry

Learners will be given the opportunity to develop their skills of geographical enquiry throughout the course and will undertake at least two fieldtrips, each in a contrasting environment.

How the GCSE is Assessed

Unit 1: Changing Physical and Human Landscapes – Written exam: 1 hr 30min (40%)

Unit 2: Environmental and Development Issues – Written exam: 1 hr 30 min (40%)

Unit 3: Applied Fieldwork Enquiry – An externally marked, classroom-based ‘open book’ task in the Autumn term of Y11, for which learners use the fieldwork portfolio they have developed throughout the course to complete (20%)

“Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. For me, Geography is a great adventure with a purpose”. Michael Palin

Key Stage 5 (A Level):

Geography is interesting, varied and deals with topics that are relevant to the world today.

As a ‘facilitating subject’, Geography is one of the subjects preferred by Russell Group universities for entry to study a wide range of courses. This is because Geography is respected as a field of knowledge and naturally develops a range of skills that support other disciplines. Studying Geography will help you keep your options open when choosing a degree, as you will demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills top universities want.

Furthermore, the wide range of transferable skills developed throughout the course, will help make you more employable!

The Geography Department has a track record of excellent examination results at A level and consistently ranks highly in ALPS.

The AS course is divided into 2 units:

Unit 1 Changing Landscapes Unit 2 Changing Places
Section A:
Changing Landscapes:
Glaciation

Section B:
Tectonic Hazards
Section A:
Changing Places

Section B:
Fieldwork Investigations
(1 each of Physical/Human Geography based on  fieldwork)

The A2 course consists of 3 units:

Unit 3 Global Systems & Global Governance Unit 4 Contemporary Themes in Geography Unit 5 Individual Investigation
Section A:
Global Systems:   
Water & Carbon Cycles
Section B:
Global Governance,
Change and Challenges (population migration and global governance
of the world’s oceans)
Section C:
21st Century Challenges
Section A:
Tectonic Hazards
Section B: Contemporary themes in Geography:
Weather & climate/    Energy (Challenges
and Dilemmas)
An independent study on a topic of your choice, that is researched and submitted for marking.

How you will be assessed ?

The examination board is WJEC. Further information on this specification is available on www.wjec.co.uk

Unit 1: a 2 hour written examination accounting for 24% of the qualification. 5 compulsory  structured questions with data response.

Unit 2: a 1hr 30min written examination accounting for 16% of the qualification. 5 compulsory structured questions with data response.

Unit 3: a 2hr written examination accounting for 24% of the qualification. 4 compulsory structured questions and 2 extended response questions

Unit 4: a 2hr written examination accounting for 16% of the qualification. 1 extended response question and 2 essays

Unit 5: non-examination assessment accounting for 20% of the qualification. Individual investigation of approx. 3000 words.

Fieldwork

Fieldwork is an essential element in Geography. Geography is about the real world so it is only right that we use the environment as our ‘outdoor classroom’ to test theories and ideas. Fieldwork is conducted in a variety of human and physical environments.

Revision

This is not an exhaustive list but a few of the websites that may be useful during revision.

GCSE:

www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zs8k4qt

https://www.s-cool.co.uk/gcse/geography

https://www.educationquizzes.com/gcse/geography/

https://www.tutor2u.net/geography/blog/28-gcse-geography-revision-quizzes

https://open.spotify.com/show/0R0mqRLGxaeRqbmDyjZZnv

A level:

https://www.tutor2u.net/geography/collections/a-level-geography-revision-quizzes

https://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/geography

https://open.spotify.com/show/5SRoXHwp606A64fRBk6ulR

https://www.brainscape.com/packs/a-level-physical-geography-8142399